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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am thinking about trading in my fiance's G35 for an IS-F. We went for a test drive yesterday and were both blown away by the vehicle. Not what I expected from Toyota but a great car. As an internal flag, I noticed the drilled rotors, brembros, and the reengineered engine and trans as items which may be costly to maintain.

Could you please give me some feedback on the maintenance schedule and costs?
 

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even in light of jaguar and buick beating lexus as the most reliable brand of car on the road. lexus is STILL the most reliable brand of car on the road, and the is f is no different.

i dont have mine yet, but the maintenance schedule would be an oil change every 5000 miles or 8000km.

my is350 hasn't had so much as a tpms sensor alert in its first year.
 

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The cost of the front brakes (rotor and pads) is about $1000 just in parts. I'm going to have to change mine soon so I looked into it. I'm sure the rears are around the same price.
 

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even in light of jaguar and buick beating lexus as the most reliable brand of car on the road. lexus is STILL the most reliable brand of car on the road, and the is f is no different.
I highly doubt that it's true. They probably paid the rater as part of a marketing strategy to buy U.S. made cars..

Just be ready to shell out $1000 everytime you go to the dealership for maintenance. If the bill is lower, then much better...
 

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The dealership I dealt with always gave me a sheet with a fixed cost on it for scheduled maintenance. You may want to ask the dealership if they have such a sheet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow, $1,000 for just the fronts - that to resurface or replace the rotors as well?

Does Lexus offer any maintenance plans to purchase sans BMW and Audi?
 

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I just replaced my front brake pads and the cost was only $127 dollars for the pads. The rotors are fine and did not require resurfacing or replacement. Currently mileage 18.5k and I could have gone probably another 5k before replacing the pads, but I wanted the lower dusting ceramic pads instead.

My DIY: http://www.clublexus.com/forums/is-f/417697-diy-is-f-front-brake-pads.html
 

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If you're already needing to replace your rotors on your IS F, you're really abusing the brakes beyond their normal operating threshold.
 

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Yes that $1000 in parts is for new rotors in the fronts with pads.
 

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I think Lexus gets an unfair rap about 8-spd being too many gears by journalists that quite honestly, for reasons there isn't much else that even compares to it, don't know how to drive it. For example, it's criticized for being slow to downshift in manual from 8th gear, while ignoring the almost instantaneous downshift from 8th to 2nd by simply moving the console shifter to the right to get the immediate 8th to 2nd drop, followed by moving it back to the left to restore the manual shift mode you were just in. In fact, in the racerboy zeal to use the steering wheel mounted paddle shifters, the console shifter probably gets ignored in all disproportion to its true usefulness, as a customary postion where most any serious M3 driver with the manual tranny would be rowing the cogs with his hand anyway. You can do the whole shmear with the console shifter on the Lexus, upshift or downshift sequentially, or exploit the automatic programmed shifts.

The observations about 8 speeds being too many are not valid, but serve to highlight that journalists used to customary 2nd gear/3rd gear corners are not comfortable learning new gears, or they find themselves choosing the wrong gear for the situation. That's not a problem with the gearbox, that's a problem of not taking ownership of the higher level of expected skill to reap the reward benefit.

And there's more to consider in regards to the firm suspension choice made by Lexus for the IS-F. If potholed Michigan roads are the baseline, the entire industry has regressed from the retired Crown Victoria police cruiser equipped with worn out shocks and fare meter. The Lexus can reach 120 mph in an eye blink. That's not the time to be coping with a car that is bottoming or getting air borne. I haven't heard of a single instance of bent rims, broken wheels or flattened tires from jamming potholes with the Lexus, even though there have been impacts severe enough to damage the fenders and the bodywork. I think that's significant. Compare that to the copious BMW forum threads on bent/broken rims and tires. Could it be that the softer damping rates that yield such a plush street and track ride will bottom hard enough over the potholed Manhattan tarmacs to break rims?

Uncompromising performance cars must make trade offs. And that's apparently where the journalists are taking exception to the choices made on the Lexus IS-F while ignoring that Lexus has other cars to choose from which are more suitable for Michigan potholes while still retaining good performance, like the Lexus GS or IS series.

I am happy with the compromises Lexus made for the IS-F compared to the racetrack focused M3 6 speed manual, which gulps fuel at 2600 rpm at 60 mph due to having six speeds, not needing (ahem) eight. Gas guzzler tax not included.

or

Having firm enough damping rates to protect against bottoming and bent/broken rims as compared again to the supremely race track focused M3 that offers lifetime BMW roadside tire changing assistance in lieu of (ahem)...including an "actual" spare tire. Good luck to him if he picks up a nail in the boonies.

Lexus made compromises, yes. There are very few cars the journalists can even drive that would have allowed them to acquire the proficiency with manual automatics, nor have many rated any of the competitive manual automatics superior to the Lexus. I suspect a more fair fight would be journalists on a racetrack comparing the IS-F to the M3 with its DCT manual automatic. There would be an equality of ineptitude to base their professional opinions on.
 

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I think Lexus gets an unfair rap about 8-spd being too many gears by journalists that quite honestly, for reasons there isn't much else that even compares to it, don't know how to drive it.
I don't get the criticism of too many gears either. If you are driving in standard auto mode, the shifts are almost imperceptible. On the racetrack the story may different (no personal experience here), but even then I wouldn't think it would be a big deal.

The ride is a bit harsh, but I don't think it really was any worse than my 02 WRX. I'd also be interested to see how the M3 compares with the standard rather than the adjustable suspension. It seems like all the press cars have the adjustable suspension.

Jeff
08 Smoky Granite Mica IS-F
 

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I think Lexus gets an unfair rap about 8-spd being too many gears by journalists that quite honestly, for reasons there isn't much else that even compares to it, don't know how to drive it. For example, it's criticized for being slow to downshift in manual from 8th gear, while ignoring the almost instantaneous downshift from 8th to 2nd by simply moving the console shifter to the right to get the immediate 8th to 2nd drop, followed by moving it back to the left to restore the manual shift mode you were just in. .
Good point. Of course you miss out on the blipping throttle when going from 8 to 2nd in D, but it definitely gets you there quicker than doing it manually.
 
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