Tire Wear and new tires - Lexus ISF / IS-F / LFA / LF-A Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-26-2010, 01:12 AM Thread Starter
kingpreetham
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Question Tire Wear and new tires

Hey All,
Just got back from the dealer. Looks like i have to replace my front tires. I still have some tread left on my rear. First tire change and 26k miles on the odo.

My front tires are worn out on the inside edge. When i asked them about the inconsistent wear, i was told that it is the way the camber is setup. And he says it is normal.

Also, what do you all think about the BFGoodrich - g-Force T/A KDW tires that costco sells?

Would y'all recommend using all season (Continental ExtremeContact DWS) tires where not needed...do they wear out quicker than others.


Cheers,
Preetham
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-26-2010, 01:47 PM
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Preetham,

Getting 26k on a High Performance tire is a great accomplishment !!! The vehicle is designed to perform it's best with a High Performance tire. Not sure about the road condition's by you, but here in the Chicagoland area, I've had a few people try to run All Season's only to be dissapointed.

They switched back to a High Performance Tire and one customer put on a set of snow tires for the winter.

Hope this helps you out.
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-26-2010, 03:57 PM
isflojo
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I think all-season tires last longer than the high-performance summer tires, but will not work as well as winter tires in the snow. Obviously, people switch to winter tires because summer tires won't work in snow.

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post #4 of 11 Old 01-26-2010, 05:30 PM
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I have Michelin PS2 All Seasons on mine as I didn't want the PS 2 sports again. Got 19k on those and they were toast when removed. Sticky though. Big difference in traction of course but ok as far as I am concerned. I do not get to track the car so its not a big issue.

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post #5 of 11 Old 01-26-2010, 09:52 PM
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You can also check out what Gymkata did with his car.

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post #6 of 11 Old 01-27-2010, 04:29 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for your response.
Looks like i might be doing what Gymkata did.
I love the current Potenza 050's and had them on my previous 350z. Let's see how the Conti's hold up and perform.
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-27-2010, 11:50 AM
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It all depends on what you are looking for in a tire. I am using the A/S tires during the colder months because they are significantly better in the rain, and have rubber that performs better in the cold. I see you are from Texas. I assume the weather there is a little warmer year round. If you wanted one set of tires for year round that will still handle wet roads well, you might want to look at the Continental ExtremeContact DW tires. They are a max performance summer tire, and have a UTQG of 340 AA A, which is awesome compared to the Bridgestone Potenza REO50A UTQG rating of 140 A A. Essentially the Continentals should have excellent grip, last twice as long, and work better in rain. They should also be cheaper.

I just pulled the UTQG specs off of tirerack.com, so I assume it is correct. Also, by comparison the Continental ExremeContact DWS A/S tires have a UTQG of 540 A A. They should last much much longer than the REO50A.

2008 Lexus IS F - SGM - JoeZ intake pipe, Tom's filter, Borla catback exhaust, 30% tint all around, 245/35R19 and 275/30R19 Continental DWS tires
2006 Honda CBR1000RR - Akrapovic Evolution Line Race Exhaust, BMC Race Air Filters, Vortec Rear Sets, Bazzaz Tuner, Dyno Mapped
2000 Honda S2000 (Sold and missed)- AP2 in an AP1, BC coilovers, Prodrive monoblock forged wheels, etc.

"ENTHUSIASM IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR CAPABILITY" "Be ashamed to die until you have done something good for mankind."

Last edited by Gymkata; 01-27-2010 at 11:56 AM.
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post #8 of 11 Old 01-27-2010, 11:54 AM
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I also pulled this directly off of tirerack.com. It should explain the UTQG tire rating system.

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) Uniform Tire Quality Grade Standards (UTQG) were originated to provide consumers with useful information to help them purchase tires based on their relative treadwear, traction and temperature capabilities. While it is required by law for most passenger car tires sold in the United States, it is not required for deep treaded light truck tires, winter/snow tires, temporary spare tires, trailer tires, tires under 12 in diameter and other select tires.

When looking at UTQG ratings it is important to realize that the Department of Transportation does not conduct the tests. The grades are assigned by the tire manufacturers based on their test results or those conducted by an independent testing company they have hired. The NHTSA has the right to inspect the tire manufacturer's data and can fine them if inconsistencies are found. While most new tire lines have their grades established when they are introduced, they are allowed a 6-month grace period to allow the tire manufacturer to test actual production tires. Once a grade is assigned it must be branded on the tire's upper sidewall and printed on its label.

Unfortunately, the rating that is of the most interest to consumers is the one that appears to be the least consistent. While the Treadwear Grade was originally intended to be assigned purely scientifically, it has also become a marketing tool used by manufacturers to help position and promote their tires.

Treadwear Grades

UTQG Treadwear Grades are based on actual road use in which the test tire is run in a vehicle convoy along with standardized Course Monitoring Tires. The vehicle repeatedly runs a prescribed 400-mile test loop in West Texas for a total of 7,200 miles. The vehicle can have its alignment set, air pressure checked and tires rotated every 800 miles. The test tire's and the Monitoring Tire's wear are measured during and at the conclusion of the test. The tire manufacturers then assign a Treadwear Grade based on the observed wear rates. The Course Monitoring Tire is assigned a grade and the test tire receives a grade indicating its relative treadwear. A grade of 100 would indicate that the tire tread would last as long as the test tire, 200 would indicate the tread would last twice as long, 300 would indicate three times as long, etc.

The problem with UTQG Treadwear Grades is that they are open to some interpretation on the part of the tire manufacturer because they are assigned after the tire has only experienced a little treadwear as it runs the 7,200 miles. This means that the tire manufacturers need to extrapolate their raw wear data when they are assigning Treadwear Grades, and that their grades can to some extent reflect how conservative or optimistic their marketing department is. Typically, comparing the Treadwear Grades of tire lines within a single brand is somewhat helpful, while attempting to compare the grades between different brands is not as helpful.

Traction Grades

UTQG Traction Grades are based on the tire's straight line wet coefficient of traction as the tire skids across the specified test surfaces. The UTQG traction test does not evaluate dry braking, dry cornering, wet cornering, or high speed hydroplaning resistance.

The Traction Grade is determined by installing properly inflated test tires on the instrumented axle of a "skid trailer." The skid trailer is pulled behind a truck at a constant 40 mph over wet asphalt and wet concrete test surfaces. Its brakes are momentarily locked and the axle sensors measure the tire's coefficient of friction (braking g forces) as it slides. Since this test evaluates a sliding tire at a constant 40 mph, it places more emphasis on the tire's tread compound and less emphasis on its tread design.

In 1997, the UTQG Traction Grades were revised to provide a new category of AA for the highest performing tires in addition to the earlier A, B and C grades. Previously the A grade had been the highest available and was awarded to tires that offered wet coefficients of traction above 0.47 g on asphalt and 0.35 g on concrete. Today the grades and their traction coefficients are as follows:
Traction
Grades Asphalt
g force Concrete
g force
AA Above 0.54 0.41
A Above 0.47 0.35
B Above 0.38 0.26
C Less Than 0.38 0.26


Unfortunately the immediate value of this change to tire buyers will be limited. Use of the AA grade will first be seen on new tires that are introduced after the standard was enacted and will then appear later on tires that have had the required wet traction all along, but were introduced when the single A was the highest available grade.

Temperature (Resistance) Grades

The UTQG Temperature Grade indicates the extent to which heat is generated/ or dissipated by a tire. If the tire is unable to dissipate the heat effectively or if the tire is unable to resist the destructive effects of heat buildup, its ability to run at high speeds is reduced. The grade is established by measuring a loaded tire's ability to operate at high speeds without failure by running an inflated test tire against a large diameter high-speed laboratory test wheel.
Temperature
Grades Speeds
in mph
A Over 115
B Between 100 to 115
C Between 85 to 100


Every tire sold in the United States must be capable of earning a "C" rating which indicates the ability to withstand 85 mph speeds. While there are numerous detail differences, this laboratory test is similar in nature to those used to confirm a tire's speed ratings.

Unfortunately for all of the money spent to test, brand and label the tires sold in the United States, the Uniform Tire Quality Grade Standards have not fully met their original goal of clearly informing consumers about the capabilities of their tires. Maybe it's because tires are so complex and their uses can be so varied, that the grades don't always reflect their actual performance in real world use.

2008 Lexus IS F - SGM - JoeZ intake pipe, Tom's filter, Borla catback exhaust, 30% tint all around, 245/35R19 and 275/30R19 Continental DWS tires
2006 Honda CBR1000RR - Akrapovic Evolution Line Race Exhaust, BMC Race Air Filters, Vortec Rear Sets, Bazzaz Tuner, Dyno Mapped
2000 Honda S2000 (Sold and missed)- AP2 in an AP1, BC coilovers, Prodrive monoblock forged wheels, etc.

"ENTHUSIASM IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR CAPABILITY" "Be ashamed to die until you have done something good for mankind."
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post #9 of 11 Old 01-28-2010, 01:31 AM Thread Starter
kingpreetham
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Thanks Gymkata..great info!! Exactly what i needed
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post #10 of 11 Old 03-25-2013, 08:59 PM
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Tire Option Continental

I have a 2006 IS 250AWD 17 Inch with TPMS. I am running a 225/45-17 Continental tire sold at Discount Tire. They are a cheaper tire with higher mileage warranty of 50,000 miles. They have been routinely rotated and have worn excellent. They are measured at a 7 with 40,000 miles currently on them. Almost exclusively highway mileage. The OEM Bridgestone Potenzas I had previously had much more grip, but wore much more rapidly. The grip was most noticeable on merging on the highway ramp and light rain conditions. NTB and Discount Tire also offer credits of up to $25 per tire for used tires in good condition. Hope this helps.
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